Tuesday, July 11, 2006

La Bona Libro... Kaj Plu

Today I went to Downtown Yerushalayim (near the Kosher Ethiopian restaurant me and a friend saw the finals of the World Cup at) to pick up a book for Mar Gavriel. And then I decided to see what else they might have in the store to interest me.

Among other finds, I got an Aram Soba siddur, Shadal's commentary (with Italian translation!) on Yesha‘yahu/Isaiah, and...

For the non-linguists among us, this means:
THE
HOLY BIBLE

OLD AND NEW TESTAMENTS
TRANSLATED FROM THE ORIGINAL LANGUAGES

LONDON
BRITISH AND SCOTTISH BIBLE SOCIETY
EDINBURGH AND GLASGOW
NATIONAL BIBLE SOCIETY OF SCOTLAND
1947


The next page, though, is even cooler:
(ignore the Christian Supersessionism)

THE OLD TESTAMENT
TRANSLATED FROM THE ORIGINAL HEBREW
LAZAR LUDOVIC ZAMENHOF

In other words, the "Old Testament" (a.k.a. our Tanakh, with the books misarranged) portion of this Bible uses a translation of the Tanakh written by Dr. Eli‘ezer (Leyzer) Zamenhof, "Doktoro Esperanto" himself!

And here we have the beginning of Bereishit/Genesis:


And this is the beginning of this week's parsha:


(and it only cost 50₪... marked down from 400!)

12 Comments:

Blogger Mississippi Fred MacDowell said...

That's pretty wild.

Please tell me you don't know Esperanto though!

7/11/2006 5:19 PM  
Blogger Steg (dos iz nit der šteg) said...

Nope, don't speak Esperanto.
I just know a little bit about how it works.

Like all nouns ending with -o (in the singular nominative form), and mal- being a general-purpose prefix for making pairs of opposites.

7/11/2006 5:33 PM  
Blogger The back of the hill said...

Malnovo = old. Now that's cool. Old is a deficiency of new.

7/11/2006 6:17 PM  
Blogger Steg (dos iz nit der šteg) said...

Supposedly mal- implies no value judgement; it just means "opposite". I don't know how it was decided which would get the basic word and which would get the derived opposite, though.

7/11/2006 6:23 PM  
Blogger Ezer K'negdo said...

I lived on Rechov ShaDaL in Jerusalem for 2 years, and my husband is half Italian, and I actually own that same translation - very funny! We particularly like ShaDaL for so many reasons :-) I miss that neighborhood. We moved from there to NYC and then to Monsey, which is SO not the same. We now live very far elsewhere, but your post brought me back to a great time in our lives!

7/11/2006 11:17 PM  
Blogger Lipman said...

Still supposed to dispose of it, aren't you…

7/12/2006 4:52 AM  
Blogger Steg (dos iz nit der šteg) said...

Ezer:

I didn't even know there was a Shadal street here :-) ... looks like it's right near the Shuq, good location!


Lipman:

For sure?

7/12/2006 5:17 AM  
Blogger Ezer K'negdo said...

FABULOUS neighborhood. I loved it. I would get fresh, hot bourekas every morning for breakfast while waiting for my bus. Very few English speakers, VERY few Ashkenazim. I was looking for this type of experience and it was wonderful. Never a dull moment. I wrote about some of it here: http://ezerknegdo.blogspot.com/2006/05/israel.html

MUCH better than Monsey :-)

7/12/2006 11:27 AM  
Blogger manuscriptboy said...

Did you notice Zamenhoff lane, right near the US consulate?

7/12/2006 12:32 PM  
Blogger Steg (dos iz nit der šteg) said...

Manuscriptboy:

I have a picture of rehhov Zamenhof in Tel-Aviv, but that's it. I think i've seen the one in J'lem on a map.

7/12/2006 12:52 PM  
Blogger thanbo said...

We stayed in the Center Hotel, on Rechov Zamenhof in T-A, right off the singing fountain.

Didn't know who he was at the time, though (1998).

Not a bad hotel, and they had rooms when my initial plan (the Gordon Hotel, which turned out to be youth hostel rooms) failed.

P.S. I posted the story on my blog.

7/13/2006 6:04 PM  
Blogger Jen Taylor Friedman said...

If you felt like picking up about six mezuza klafim (three or so 15cms and three or so 12cms) and one of those little floppy pocket-size Rinat Yisraels (I've left Will's at some unknown location in the British Isles), that would be an awfully useful feeling. But no pressure if you're busy.

7/16/2006 6:58 AM  

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